Birthing and postpartum support

During your birth journey you will make a number of decisions. On of the first options you will choose is your care provider. There are two types of care providers available today for pregnancy and birth. One is the "traditional" approach of having an OB-GYN. These are highly skilled medical doctors with a specialty in surgery.  Their training is focused more on the disease process, disorders, and of course surgery. They have very little training when it comes to natural childbirth.They will deliver your baby at a hospital and use the Medical Model of Care approach to childbirth. 

Below is a brief description of each of type of midwife:


  • Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM): an individual trained and licensed in both nursing and midwifery. Nurse-midwives possess at least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education and are certified by the American College of Nurse Midwives.
  • Certified Professional Midwife (CPM): an individual trained in midwifery who meets practice standards of the North American Registry of Midwives.
  • Direct-Entry Midwife (DEM): an independent individual trained in midwifery through a variety of sources that can include: self-study, apprenticeship, a midwifery school, or a college/university program.
  • Certified Midwife (CM): an individual trained and certified in midwifery. Certified midwives possess at least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education and are certified by the American College of Nurse Midwives.
  • Lay Midwife: an individual who is not certified or licensed as a midwife but has been trained informally through self-study or apprenticeship.

Your second choice is a midwife. Midwives are qualified health care providers who go through comprehensive training and examinations for certification. Not only do Midwives believe in facilitating a natural childbirth as much as possible, it is the focus of their training. Certification is offered by the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM) and the North American Registry of Midwives (NARM). The practice and credentials related to midwifery differ throughout the United States. 

Midwifery Model of Care


This model of care is designed to maintain and enhance a women’s physiological and physiological resources for giving birth. It’s based on these premises:


  • Birth is a normal physiological process and an emotionally transformative experience.
  • A women’s state of mind influences the labor process, so individualized care is necessary.
  • Because a woman’s participation contributes to a healthy pregnancy, labor, and birth, childbirth preparation is necessary.
  • Low intervention and cesarean rates are desirable.
  • Caregivers monitor the mother’s and baby’s wellbeing and provide education and support. If problems arise, they start with tools that cause the least intervention to regain a healthy physiological process. ​​

 Medical Model of Care

This model of care is designed to replace or alter the body’s own resources with medical and technological interventions. It’s based on these premises:


  • The natural childbirth process is unpredictable, unreliable, and potentially unsafe. Routine care protocols for all women give the caregiver a sense of control over the birth process.
  • Medical interventions improve labor and birth.
  • Cesareans are no less safe for the mother or baby than natural labor and vaginal birth: in fact, they may be safer.
  • Caregivers use routine interventions before problems arise. If problems arise, they intervene quickly with the tool most likely to have the quickest effect.




 

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